Walt Whitman

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125_Walt Whitman.jpg
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Walt Whitman

150.00

Original 11x17” watercolor portrait of Walt Whitman as featured in The Art of the Affair: An Illustrated History of Love, Sex, and Artistic Influence. Framed as shown in alternate images. Comes with a copy of the book signed by the illustrator.

As he appears in the text:

“When Oscar [Wilde] was sent on a lecture tour through America in 1882, he immediately asked if he could meet Walt Whitman, whose work he’d long admired. The two spent some hours alone in Whitman’s den where, the poet said, they could “be on ‘thee and thou’ terms.” They spoke of literature and literary fame, and Walt gave Oscar a portrait of himself. Oscar later arranged a second meeting before his return to London. ‘There is no one in this wide great world of America whom I love and honour so much,’ he wrote. Walt later described Oscar as ‘a fine large handsome youngster.’”

About The Art of the Affair, by Catherine Lacey and Forsyth Harmon:

Poet Robert Lowell died of a heart attack, clutching a portrait of his lover, Caroline Blackwood, painted by her ex-husband, Lucian Freud. Lowell was on his way to see his own ex-wife, Elizabeth Hardwick, who was a longtime friend of Mary McCarthy. McCarthy left the father of her child to marry Edmund Wilson, who had encouraged her writing, and had also brought critical attention to the fiction of Anaïs Nin . . . whom he later bedded. And so it goes, the long chain of love, affections, and artistic influences among writers, musicians, and artists that weaves its way through the The Art of the Affair--from Frida Kahlo to Colette to Hemingway to Dali; from Coco Chanel to Stravinsky to Miles Davis to Orson Welles.

"The perfect coffee-table book for the starving artist in your life."
 The Washington Post

"If you could use a dose of naughty narrated A-list gossip—from Collette to Ellington, Kahlo to Mapplethorpe—get The Art of the Affair."
— Elle Magazine

"Gorgeously illustrated... It’s impossible not to lose yourself in the intimate, deliciously scandalous details... and to feel a real connection as you look into the deep-set eyes of Caroline Blackwood or a vicarious thrill at the way a cigarette dangles out of Juliette Gréco’s open mouth."
 NYLON

"If you have a weakness for gossip, you won’t be able to resist."
 Bustle

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